How to you memorize words? Share with us all of your tips!! | General discussion | Forum

How to you memorize words? Share with us all of your tips!! | General discussion | Forum

Benny
A A A

Please consider registering
guest

Log In Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —

  

— Match —

   

— Forum Options —

    

Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Topic RSS Related Topics
How to you memorize words? Share with us all of your tips!!
December 29, 2012
09:09
lingholic
New Member
Forum Posts: 5
$0
Member Since:
December 27, 2012
Offline

Hey guys!

I've recently been thinking a lot about memory techniques and ways to remember words and phrases more easily during the process of foreign language acquisition, and I was wondering what you guys did in order to memorize new words and phrases. Obviously learning new words represents a huge part of the process of learning a new language, and I find it amazing that so few people actually spend the time necessary to learn memory techniques in order to facilitate that process.

Well, in any case, I came up with 12 memory techniques, of which I made a blog post for each on my website. I was wondering, though, if you knew any other ways to help make remembering more easy and effortless. What's your trick? Do you simply learn by rote, or do you have a specific routine/technique that makes it easier? And finally, approximately how many new words a day/week/month do you try to learn?

Here are the 12 ways I have found that work very well to improve one's memory. I'd love to hear your own tips and tricks.

1. Put in Your Emotions

2. Pay Attention, Focus

3. Use Mnemonics

4. Learn From Context

5. Use Visualization Techniques

6. Repeat, Repeat, and Review

7. Deal with Material That You Can Understand For The Most Part

8. Make Associations and Analogies; Connect Newly Acquired Information With Stuff You Already Know

9. Get the Language On Your Tongue; Read Loudly, Repeat The Sounds

10. Eat Healthily and Exercise To Keep Your Mind Sharp

11. Learn Through Music

12. Divide Your Time In Short Bursts Of Study

 

Let's get the ball rolling!

Language learning is a journey, not a destination - www.lingholic.com
December 29, 2012
23:02
Kevinpost
Orlando, Florida, U.S.A.

moderator
Forum Posts: 499
$0
Member Since:
July 15, 2011
Offline

What about learning kinesthetically? i.e. Using hands, facial expressions and gestures to remember words and phrases. 

Speaks:    
Learning to fluency:  
There will definitely be more that follow!
December 30, 2012
08:02
Raphacam
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Member
Forum Posts: 173
$15
Member Since:
September 18, 2011
Offline

I always make up sentences to fit the word in and I keep reading and analysing them, no matter how big or apparently complicated the word is, it'll be eventually memorised. For example, the Esperanto word "amiko":

 

Mi estas kun mia bona amiko

 

And, if the language has something like not presumable gender or odd declension/plural patterns, I make up lot of sentences. For example, the German word Mann, masculine and with the plural form Männer:

 

Der Mann ist mein Freund

Wo sind die Männer?

 


This way, we can see the word in it's different forms. In this example, the presence of der in the first sentence means the word is masculine, and the second sentence shows the plural form.

Native: Português Fluent: English Deutsch Español Non-fluent: Esperanto Français Italiano Galego Basic: Latīna ייִדיש Abandoned experiences: Eλληνικά Pусский Cymraeg Bokmål LIBRAS

January 2, 2013
03:51
lingholic
New Member
Forum Posts: 5
$0
Member Since:
December 27, 2012
Offline

Hey Kevinpost, yeah I've heard about learning kinesthetically, it's a method called "Total Physical Response (TPR)". Personally, I've never tried it (it doesn't seem that practical to me, especially when you need to memorize words that do not involve any physical action). Have you ever tried it? I'm sure it might work well for teaching/learning really basic stuff, like "I'm holding the pencil in my hand", or "I'm opening the door" or something like that. I guess if you go to a foreign country and somebody who doesn't speak your language is trying to teach you their native language, it would be a good way to go. Otherwise, not too sure.

 

Raphacam, your method reminds me of Tim Ferriss' "Deconstruction" method. He gives an example, in his book "The 4-hour Chef", of how he learns languages. He says he focuses, at first, on a bunch of simple sentences where you can see how nouns, verbs, and pronouns are used differently. Here's an example taken from his book:

 

Here are the 12 sentences, the “Deconstruction Dozen”:

The apple is red.

It is John’s apple.

I give John the apple.

We give him the apple.

 

He gives it to John.

She gives it to him.

 

Is the apple red?

The apples are red.

 

I must give it to him.

I want to give it to her.

I’m going to know tomorrow.

(I have eaten the apple.)

I can’t eat the apple.

 

"The benefits of these few lines can be astonishing", he says.

 

Seems like a decent technique to me, and it gives the learner a powerful overview of the grammatical structure of the language and of how basic sentences are constructed. Seeing the word in its different forms is definitely something that can help memorization. Although that wouldn't work for languages such as Chinese, since words only have a single form.

 

Anyhow, keep the ideas coming! Anybody else has their own technique for memorizing words? Once again, I'm surprised this topic hasn't surfaced more before, since it's such a huge part of language learning.

Language learning is a journey, not a destination - www.lingholic.com
January 2, 2013
12:31
Raphacam
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Member
Forum Posts: 173
$15
Member Since:
September 18, 2011
Offline

Oh, I've heard of these a long time ago, I didn't even remember of the guy smile

It's also worthy to make lists and always have a tiny list in your pocket to read in the bus or waiting on a line, always works for me.

Native: Português Fluent: English Deutsch Español Non-fluent: Esperanto Français Italiano Galego Basic: Latīna ייִדיש Abandoned experiences: Eλληνικά Pусский Cymraeg Bokmål LIBRAS

January 3, 2013
11:24
Chase4

Member
Forum Posts: 16
$30
Member Since:
November 26, 2012
Offline

When I learn words... I visualize how I saw them. If someone spoke them to me, I remember the person saying the word for the first time. If I saw the word on a flashcard, I see the flashcard. Being that I am very visual, I just see the words scrolling in front of me while speaking.

-Chase

Native: English Intermediate: Norwegian Beginner: Hit List:
January 5, 2013
08:14
Randybvain
Cheltenham, UK

Experienced Language Hacker
Forum Posts: 450
$0
Member Since:
August 2, 2011
Offline

Actually, I don't know any effective way to memorise words. I tried the most of the ones you mentioned, they didn't work, so I stopped to learn words in any forceful way. For when it comes to the recall, it is your unconscious mind who picks up the proper word from your memory and it acts at random. One day I remembered a word, the next I didn't so why to bother? Now I just let it do itself.

Anyway, I like to create sentences which say something personal to me.

Native: Polski | Fluent: English Cymraeg  Français | Elementary and beginner: LATĪNVM Русский
I learned also a bit: Ελληνική γλώσσα Словѣньскъ Gaeilge I would like to learn: Català Deutsch Lietuvių 官话 Kaszëbsczi jãzëk
Polska strona języka walijskiego

The Minstrel's Glade

January 5, 2013
09:21
lingholic
New Member
Forum Posts: 5
$0
Member Since:
December 27, 2012
Offline

I suspect you didn't try the method I outlined above hard enough. Most of these are tried and tested memory techniques that have worked for people across time and ages. I think the most powerful techniques are mnemonics and the method of loci (Memory Palace). Learning words is not about learning "forcefully". It's simply about aiding your brain to remember what you're learning. Without any technique, it's highly inefficient to simply learn by rote.

I highly recommend you to try some of the techniques I mentioned more in detail. Check out my blog if you're interested in learning more. Dominic O'Brien, eight-time memory world champion, managed to learn and actually remember 320 new German words in an hour (after one sighting of each word), his personal best. Not bad for a dyslexic slow learner who barely managed to scrape through with passes in French and Spanish in high school. Believe me, memory techniques can work.

Language learning is a journey, not a destination - www.lingholic.com
January 5, 2013
12:01
Randybvain
Cheltenham, UK

Experienced Language Hacker
Forum Posts: 450
$0
Member Since:
August 2, 2011
Offline

Memory Palace and mnemonics means that you must memorise them first. And this is an additional effort because to do that you have to use some other memorisation props. Instead of remembering a word you must keep in mind some more complex structure, a poem or else. For example the way Benny had written about (the image association) entails not only remembering the images but also the code or how the image is associated with the word. When you need the word you must spend much more time and effort to recall all this complex "aid".

If you suspect that I didn't try hard enough you mean that learning must be something hard and arduous. I disagree because an effort leads to resistance and ultimately gives no prize.

Memory-champions who are good in learning lists of words or phone numbers or other stuff like that are the memory-champions so they could do it with or without any techniques.

Native: Polski | Fluent: English Cymraeg  Français | Elementary and beginner: LATĪNVM Русский
I learned also a bit: Ελληνική γλώσσα Словѣньскъ Gaeilge I would like to learn: Català Deutsch Lietuvių 官话 Kaszëbsczi jãzëk
Polska strona języka walijskiego

The Minstrel's Glade

January 6, 2013
00:03
lingholic
New Member
Forum Posts: 5
$0
Member Since:
December 27, 2012
Offline
10

Memory-champions who are good in learning lists of words or phone numbers or other stuff like that are the memory-champions so they could do it with or without any techniques.

I'm sorry my friend but I must say you couldn't be farther from the [Beware! This is SPAM posted by a third party]. Memory champions are normal people who have studied memory techniques and perfected those techniques. If you're interested in reading more about such champions and how they got to be where they are, check out books by Dominic O'Brien, or "Moonwalking with Einstein" by Joshua Foer.

 

Memory techniques have to be learned, yes. That's an investment you have to make in order to make remembering in the future much easier. Check out my guest post on The Polyglot Dream website if you're interested, it's entitled "The Laziness Paradox" and it's very relevant to this discussion.

Cheers!

Language learning is a journey, not a destination - www.lingholic.com
January 6, 2013
04:41
Randybvain
Cheltenham, UK

Experienced Language Hacker
Forum Posts: 450
$0
Member Since:
August 2, 2011
Offline

Well, it was an opinion. I should have added "I think".

Stories are stories. One may invent anyone to corroborate his thesis. Also the cases of gifted (or hard-working) individuals don't take me.

Of course it doesn't mean that any of these techniques are bad but just what I have written - they simply didn't work for me. My personal experience shouldn't have any influence, because it is only personal. So the fact that I didn't succeed with ANKI doesn't mean that it is not useful for thousands of other people.

Apart from ANKI I tried the mnemonics, loci, visual association and analogies and I found it very hard and complex to remember not only a word but also the thing which should lead to its remembering like something I know or a verse or how looks the room. It is not like using a bus to get somewhere faster but like carrying the bus along.

Emotions and focus are something you do unconsciously so I can't see how to apply it in learning.

Learning from context is very good when you know language to good degree.

Using music is nice but I think that it should be applied on the higher level when one can pronounce the sounds properly otherwise it fixes bad pronunciation.

The Pomodoro technique is great however it breaks the flow of learning and it is hard to get back to it.

(I have just read your articles on the blog and left some comments.)

Native: Polski | Fluent: English Cymraeg  Français | Elementary and beginner: LATĪNVM Русский
I learned also a bit: Ελληνική γλώσσα Словѣньскъ Gaeilge I would like to learn: Català Deutsch Lietuvių 官话 Kaszëbsczi jãzëk
Polska strona języka walijskiego

The Minstrel's Glade

Forum Timezone: America/New_York

Most Users Ever Online: wp_m8bqz1_sferrorlog

Currently Online: HannahMillieLouise
47 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

Stephanie S: 742

Kevinpost: 499

Randybvain: 450

this_just_in: 328

Alasdair: 304

sipes23: 260

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 9

Members: 62880

Moderators: 2

Admins: 5

Forum Stats:

Groups: 5

Forums: 16

Topics: 4910

Posts: 24843

Newest Members: torresanderson, phill booth, preodamo, jackmtyson, Big Jim, raph19

Moderators: Lingo: 664, anno: 205

Administrators: Benny: 485, balint: 0, tweaky: 0, AlexW: 0, The Duke: 0