Resources for American English accent | Resources for speaking | Forum

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Resources for American English accent
August 9, 2011
21:47
stefano1994
Piedmont, IT

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Today I found this book: Improve Your American English Accent: Overcoming Major Obstacles to Understanding by Charlsie Childs. So, anybody has ever heard about it? I really want to make my accent (which now is horrible, between italian and southamerican style) similar to an american native speaker. Do you think it could be helpful? This course consists in 1 booklet of 45 pages and six 35 minutes lessons, in which are explained the most difficult pronunciations of american english and other phonetical stuff.

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August 10, 2011
01:14
RiaLucia
San Diego, CA, USA

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I would be really curious to see how a book can illustrate the finer points of regional accents!

 

I am quite enamored with non-US English accents (since I am an American, they sound "fun" to me), and when I want to hear examples of particular ones, I go for YouTube.  That's what I would recommend to you, although some people post videos that are just doing bad impressions of another American region's accent!  There are so many variations even within the general types, for example, a trained ear can tell you the difference between a Texan accent and a Georgian accent, although to me it all kinda just sounds "Southern".  The New England/Northeastern area of the U.S. in particular has many--especially in New York/Boston/Rhode Island.

 

If you want to sound, for lack of a better term, "generically American", try Midwest or Great Lakes region.  I would say try West Coast, but I don't know if you'll find any result other than people doing really exaggerated "Valley Girl" or "Surfer Dude" accents, which are more of a pop culture thing from Southern California in the 80s and 90s.

Native: English (U.S.)  |  Improving: Deutsch (DE)  |  Hope to Learn: Italiano
August 10, 2011
21:22
stefano1994
Piedmont, IT

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RiaLucia said:

I would be really curious to see how a book can illustrate the finer points of regional accents!

 

I am quite enamored with non-US English accents (since I am an American, they sound "fun" to me), and when I want to hear examples of particular ones, I go for YouTube.  That's what I would recommend to you, although some people post videos that are just doing bad impressions of another American region's accent!  There are so many variations even within the general types, for example, a trained ear can tell you the difference between a Texan accent and a Georgian accent, although to me it all kinda just sounds "Southern".  The New England/Northeastern area of the U.S. in particular has many--especially in New York/Boston/Rhode Island.

 

If you want to sound, for lack of a better term, "generically American", try Midwest or Great Lakes region.  I would say try West Coast, but I don't know if you'll find any result other than people doing really exaggerated "Valley Girl" or "Surfer Dude" accents, which are more of a pop culture thing from Southern California in the 80s and 90s.

Well, I know that there are a lot of differences between accents, I lived in America for a little while...I just want to make my italian influence as neutral as possible, since I'm young and I can do it with few problems (everybody I talk with tell me that I have a pretty good accent)...

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August 13, 2011
03:13
Ambros
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I've dabbled a little in what I hear as the 'standard' North American accent (for theatre) and phonetics generally (find it a fascinating subject) and, from what I can tell, it looks like a very useful book from the Amazon previews -- there is also a book called 'Mastering the American Accent' by Lisa Mojsin, which has CDs as well, and that looks slightly less technical but just as useful. I imagine that either would be helpful. Good luck! Accents are fun!

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August 13, 2011
23:42
stefano1994
Piedmont, IT

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Ambros said:

I've dabbled a little in what I hear as the 'standard' North American accent (for theatre) and phonetics generally (find it a fascinating subject) and, from what I can tell, it looks like a very useful book from the Amazon previews — there is also a book called 'Mastering the American Accent' by Lisa Mojsin, which has CDs as well, and that looks slightly less technical but just as useful. I imagine that either would be helpful. Good luck! Accents are fun!

I have both, just need to choose what to use (first, I can read and study on both)…cool

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August 14, 2011
02:03
Kevinpost
Orlando, Florida, U.S.A.

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National news is a great place to pick up a more neutral accent. 

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August 14, 2011
21:13
stefano1994
Piedmont, IT

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Kevinpost said:

National news is a great place to pick up a more neutral accent. 

It's also a great place to get bored laugh But I used to follow FOX news for a long time, then I discovered other resources...

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August 19, 2011
21:47
misslanguagelearning

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Honestly, you won't learn an accent by studying a book. I'm currently listening to the news, and I'm pretty sure that will help me sound better in English. On a good day, my accent is native-like. I worked on pronunciation, sure, but I also listened to a lot of English. I'm talking thousands of hours. Your brain needs to memorize the different sounds of the language really well before you can produce them.

While mimicking and speaking may help you sound better, only massive amounts of listening will help you sound native-like.

I'm a young woman interested in language learning. For language learning tips, please visit my blog: http://fluent-language.blogspot.com I also have a blog which contains a lot of tips for losing weight: http://lose-weight111.blogspot.com Speaks: French, English Learning: German
August 19, 2011
22:02
Hekje
Providence, Rhode Island

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Haha, I always wondered if anyone out there ever went for an American English accent!

I'd be happy to Skype with you and point out the discrepancies between your accent and a native American accent. I'm from Maryland, which is a mid-Atlantic state, so I know my accent is very standard.

Good luck!

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