Join almost 1 million
monthly
readers!

Contact Me

Coaching and Consultation

Join almost 1 million monthly readers!

Contact Me

Coaching and Consultation

Adjectives in Italian | Specific language questions | Forum

A A A

Please consider registering
guest

Log In Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search:

— Forum Scope —



— Match —



— Forum Options —




Wildcard usage:
*  matches any number of characters    %  matches exactly one character

Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Topic RSS
Adjectives in Italian
January 13, 2012
16:10
casanovaeuropa
Member
Forum Posts: 13
Member Since:
January 6, 2012
Offline

Hey guys I have a couple grammatical questions in Italian

When do you put adjectives before and after verbs?
As in "la casa mia" or in the reverse mode adjective noun

And how do you use words like lo, la, le?
As in "lo so" or "le posso fare una demanda"

Speaks: English, German, Italian Learning: French, Mandarin Chinese
January 13, 2012
16:48
aapplejuicee
Italy
Member
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
November 22, 2011
Offline

When do you put adjectives before and after verbs?

There's category of adjectives called "aggettivi qualificativi", such as "grande", "bello", "freddo". These adjectives have to be put after the verb in the 80% of the cases (example: té freddo, casa grande). 

However, there's a little exception to this rule. In fact if you want to create more emphasis you have to put the adjective before the noun. If you see a very big house, you could say "it's so big!". In Italian you say this moving the adjective "grande" before "casa" and you'll obtain "grande casa".

If you need to give directions to a foreign person, you could say "Quando vedi una grande casa gialla devi girare a destra" (when you see a big yellow house you have to turn right)

 

There are other kinds of adjectives, such as possessives ones, that have to put it before the noun.

For example: la mia casa, il tuo gatto (and not "la casa mia", "il gatto tuo")

 

You put two different examples in your question.

in "lo so", lo is a pronoun.  

Example:

A: Ti devi preparare per il pranzo (you have to prepare for lunch)

B:  Lo so (I know) (and not: So che mi devo preparare per il pranzo. "Lo" replaces the sentence)

 

In "le posso fare una demanda", le means "to you" and it's the courtesy form. 

 

Is it clear? 

     
feel free to correct my mistakes,
I will appreciate it!
Forum Timezone: America/New_York

Most Users Ever Online: wp_m8bqz1_sferrorlog

Currently Online: Lingo, Susanna
21 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

Kevinpost: 499

Stephanie S: 489

Randybvain: 450

this_just_in: 328

Alasdair: 304

sipes23: 260

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 9

Members: 54393

Moderators: 2

Admins: 3

Forum Stats:

Groups: 5

Forums: 16

Topics: 3662

Posts: 19723

Newest Members: MA, sasa1111, karloscorrea, Soulkatt, lynda, Tino011

Moderators: Lingo (289), anno (205)

Administrators: Benny (474), tweaky (0), AlexW (0)