French pronunciation of what should be a silent "e" in a song. Help. | Specific language questions | Forum

French pronunciation of what should be a silent "e" in a song. Help. | Specific language questions | Forum

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French pronunciation of what should be a silent "e" in a song. Help.
January 13, 2012
12:13
cordovez
Paris, France

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January 10, 2012
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This is the song. You only need to listen to the first stanza.

I can't seem to embed the video so follow this link:

J'avais dessiné sur le sable
Son doux visage qui me souriait,
Puis il a plu sur cette plage.
Dans cet orage elle a disparu.

I wonder if the way he prononounces "Sable (sabluh) …visage (visaguh) … plage … orage " in the stanza above is the standard way of pronouncing it or if he is doing it to rhyme and for poetic sounds. In these words he seems to pronounce the final "e" even though it is not accented.

Speaks:  Ecuador   UK   Learning:  France Cultural background: Born and raised in Ecuador, studied mostly in English; Dublin, Ireland is home; Temporarily in Paris, France until 2016. website: http://www.el-cordovez.com
January 13, 2012
13:54
custard_creams
Sweden

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July 6, 2011
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I think it's poetic licence/fitting in a rhyme. I've heard a lot of French songs do the same.

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January 15, 2012
14:32
frapy
France

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June 29, 2011
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custard_creams said:

I think it's poetic licence/fitting in a rhyme. I've heard a lot of French songs do the same.

Absolutely.

Speaks : Studying : Dead : Ancient Greek
January 24, 2012
13:11
jpike1028
Rochester, NY

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July 12, 2011
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In French lyric diction, the final e is pronounced as a schwa when a note is written for it.  Otherwise the e is silent.  I do not know the rhyme or reason for this, but its how all singers are taught to sing French.  I had a teacher who said it was the peculiarity and the beauty of the French language.

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January 24, 2012
13:29
cordovez
Paris, France

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jpike1028 said:

I had a teacher who said it was the peculiarity and the beauty of the French language.

Yes, the French are very proud of the peculiarity of their language. I know of one French language teacher who said "English is a church, whereas French is a Cathedral". confused

Thanks for the info, though, it is all very helpful.

Speaks:  Ecuador   UK   Learning:  France Cultural background: Born and raised in Ecuador, studied mostly in English; Dublin, Ireland is home; Temporarily in Paris, France until 2016. website: http://www.el-cordovez.com
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