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Michel Thomas' straight and broken lines
February 13, 2012
10:34
Mombak
Vancouver, BC, Canada
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Forum Posts: 13
Member Since:
September 19, 2011
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I'm currently listening to Michel Thomas' Italian lessons (again) and I'm having a bit of trouble wrapping my brain around something. When he's discussing the past tense, he mentions that there is (what he calls) a straight line into the past and a broken line into the past. For whatever reason, I don't think I really understand the difference between the two. Apparently English doesn't really differentiate between the two. I've listened to it a few times, and I hear the words, but it just won't sink in.confused

 

Is there anyone who could rephrase the straight and broken line analogy for me? I just feel so dense. frown

Fluent in: Canadian English (native) Conversational in: American Sign Language Studied for Travel:   Italian  Greek  Spanish Studied in School: French Wish List: Icelandic  German  Esperanto
February 13, 2012
13:11
NKellyEmerald
Dublin, Ireland

Experienced Language Hacker
Forum Posts: 231
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July 22, 2011
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Try to think about points on a time line…

 

His dot in the past is something that happens not for a prolonged period of time… so our timeline looks like this:

 

_______________-_____________

And this               ^ Is where something happened.

 

A straight line in the past is where something happened for a prolonged period of time, for example: 'I was working there for some years.' or 'I was doing it yesterday.'

 

__————————___________

 

It's something that happened for a while. Whereas 'I did it yesterday.' as regards to a conversation doesn't imply the idea of it taking a lot of time…

 

It relates to what you're trying to imply in your conversation. If you want to suggest you were taking time to do something, it's a line, but if the time that you did it for is irrelevant to the conversation it becomes a dot. :)

Native:   Gaeilge,  English Studies:  Polish On Hold:  Spanish Next:  Italian
Is cainteoir dúchais Gaeilge mé. Same with English. Zacząłem uczyć się polskiego, y ahora, he dejado aprender el castellano.
February 13, 2012
18:38
Mombak
Vancouver, BC, Canada
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Forum Posts: 13
Member Since:
September 19, 2011
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Excellent! That actually helps. Thanks!

Fluent in: Canadian English (native) Conversational in: American Sign Language Studied for Travel:   Italian  Greek  Spanish Studied in School: French Wish List: Icelandic  German  Esperanto
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