Spanish h between two vowels | Specific language questions | Forum

Spanish h between two vowels | Specific language questions | Forum

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Spanish h between two vowels
January 30, 2012
14:43
logie100
New Zealand

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Hey guys :)

I'm just letting you know about a thing about pronounciation of have noticed in Latin America.

If the last letter of a word and the first letter of the next is a different vowel, an h/j sound is made. 

Here is some evidence, I typed spellings into google and sure enough people spell it like that:

 

Nací haca (Nací acá)

"Yo naci haca 24 años en un pueblo de gto se llama ocampo gto ,vivo actulamente en dolores hidalgo gto" 

 

Tengo huna hidea (Tengo una idea)

"Ola tengo huna hidea!!!! ¿a ber ke les pareze?"

 

As you can see, people who cant spell well can be of use :) 

Native: English (New Zealand English) Advanced: Spanish (Latin American Spanish) High Beginner: German                         Indonesian
January 30, 2012
15:01
Martín Raúl Villalba
Argentina

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Perhaps I'm miss-understanding you, but I don't think so. I don't think I've ever used a J in those cases (nor heard anyone do it), and the H is mute. And it's not like it could be the English H, as those who can't even spell Spanish are very unlikely to know enough English for that. What's more likely is those are random teenagers purposedly miss-spelling cause' they think it's "cool" or extending SMS language to the Internetz.

 

"Tengo una", "Mi altar", "Fui a casa de", "Diccionario enciclopédico", etc. There is no extra sound there, logie.

January 30, 2012
18:31
Casiopea
Spain

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I agree with Martín Raúl Villalba, I've never heard anyone saying "nací hacá". However, what you might have notice is that in Latin America, and also in Some parts of Spain, speakers tend to aspirate (or remove) the "s" sound at the end of a word or before a consonant so it sounds like an English "h". For example:

 

"A(h)pirar la(h) ese(h)" (aspirar las eses)

"Nosotro(h) somo(h) del sur, pero ahora vivimo(h) en el norte"

 

What you found written has nothing to do with a phonetic transcription but rather with a poor knowledge of the Spanish spelling (very common on the Internet). Apparently the writer(s) don't really know when a word begins with a "h" or just with a vowel (ola/huna), that "ver" is written with "v" or "parece" with "c".

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January 31, 2012
00:40
logie100
New Zealand

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Well, I have definitly heard a sound similar to j/h with phrases like tengo una idea

Perhaps its a thing native english speakers can detect, but not native spanish speakers :)

Because I know that atleast one of those sentences was written by a person who speaks spanish, but was born in the US

Native: English (New Zealand English) Advanced: Spanish (Latin American Spanish) High Beginner: German                         Indonesian
January 31, 2012
03:48
logie100
New Zealand

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Nuestra hepoca + heramos (Nuestra época + eramos ) :

tiene razon por lo de los pelaos pero en nuestra hepoca heramos iguales. 

 

ha (a) hatrebida (atrevida) hen (en):

me gustaria conoser ha una chica linda hatrebida que le gusta salir la fiesta y que tengo hen cuerpo sensual.  

Native: English (New Zealand English) Advanced: Spanish (Latin American Spanish) High Beginner: German                         Indonesian
January 31, 2012
05:52
Martín Raúl Villalba
Argentina

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Nop logie, still no English H sound. I find myself making a very slight pause at times between those word clusters, but no sound is coming out of my mouth, at all. Perhaps this is something from a specific Spanish-speaking area? Have you tried looking for YouTube videos of this happening? Or maybe you are just miss-hearing sounds? I know I do it with Japanese and Italian.

And some food for thought: Most Spanish speakers I've seen learning English usually start pronouncing the English H as an Spanish J, because the language doesn't have that sound. If we used it somewhere that probably wouldn't be the case.

January 31, 2012
06:48
logie100
New Zealand

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Hmm, okay, well I found a video where I hear it. I hear " no quiere hescuchar más"

I have linked you to the video a few seconds before this is said.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=FzAg7BnWfTI#t=15s 

Native: English (New Zealand English) Advanced: Spanish (Latin American Spanish) High Beginner: German                         Indonesian
January 31, 2012
11:56
Casiopea
Spain

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logie100 said:

Hmm, okay, well I found a video where I hear it. I hear " no quiere hescuchar más"

I have linked you to the video a few seconds before this is said.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=FzAg7BnWfTI#t=15s%C2%A0

 

You're right, she says "y no la quiere hescuchar más" or, more specifically, "y no la quiere hehcuchar más" and she keeps talking and says "para no seguir molehtando a lah mihmah personah ehta vez...". But in fact, all of those "h" should be "s", including the first one you used as an example. What she says is: "y no la quieres escuchar más" (and not "y no la quiere escuchar más").

Notice that between "molestando" and "a" (for example) there's no extra "h".

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January 31, 2012
13:13
Martín Raúl Villalba
Argentina

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I'm hearing no H and those S sound just fine.

January 31, 2012
14:57
Casiopea
Spain

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Martín Raúl Villalba said:

I'm hearing no H and those S sound just fine.

These "s" sounds are fine, but they're aspirated just like the "h" English sound.

Listen to the word "seguir" and the word "molestar" they are two completely different "s" sounds. Thing is I don't think students are told about this difference when they learn Spanish.

In fact, it's not made everywhere... for example, I don't do this aspirated "s" sound that often, maybe that's why I do hear the difference so clear.

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