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How your computer and the Internet can correct your grammar and spelling (for free)

| 50 comments | Category: Tool and Resources

google

In an ideal world, you would have a native beside you every time you spoke or wrote something, so that they could help and correct you. This is not possible for many of us! Luckily, thanks to modern technology and the Internet, you can have your grammar and spelling corrected immediately and automatically, in any language!

I have only been learning Czech for 7 weeks and this week I was writing lots of emails entirely in that language to natives and have been told that there are very few mistakes in them! Rather than this being a reflection on how great my Czech is (trust me, I have a long way to go still!!), it is actually due to applying the methods described below. As well as improving my writing skills in learning my mistakes as I go, I am also improving my grasp on the language and will be less likely to repeat these mistakes once I have been corrected a couple of times. All of these correction methods are free and instant!

Google phrase search for great grammar

Is the word masculine, feminine or neuter? What case ending (genetive, dative etc.) goes with that word after a particular preposition? Does this word require a preposition after it? You could look all of this up in a grammar book or even a (good) dictionary, but these and many other grammar issues can be answered indirectly by a basic Google search! The best part is that the process is very quick - you don’t even need to carry out the search a lot of the time thanks to the suggestions that come up in the search bar on Google’s main page. Unlike with most searches, we aren’t actually interested in the pages that it provides us with. We want to know how many results come from the search and compare it to other possibilities.

For example, if you forget if the Spanish word coche is masculine or feminine then just attach any -o or -a ending adjective after it and see how many results come up! Like I said on my post about using Google Image as a dictionary, it is best to start from Google’s site for that language. So at google.es I will simply say “small car” – is it coche pequeño or coche pequeña? Just type coche peque (not even needing to finish the word) and it will suggest 2,620,000 results for the masculine version!

In French it can be hard to remember which preposition follows a verb acting on another verb. If you simply want to say “start doing”, is it commencer faire, commencer à faire, or commencer de faire? Just search for each one! When you group words together in Google for this purpose, always enclose them in quotation marks ” ” to make sure that exact phrase is being searched for. “commencer faire” gives 3,450 results, “commencer de faire” gives 1,020 results and “commencer à faire” gives 333,000 results! We have a winner!! (The other results may never be zero, because the words may come together in other less common ways, or may simply be written wrong on some sites).

Czech’s 7 cases (genetive, date, locative etc.) makes it hard to remember how some nouns decline in certain situations. Simply saying “in the city” has the problem of remembering if you should say město, města, městu, městě or městem for the singular translation of city! Process of elimination gives me “ve města” with just 1,350 results but “ve městě” with 2,970,000 results. No need to go further!

You can imagine how many different ways you can use this. If you think that a set of words can go together, but want to check, just ask Google! There are so many sites out there and people have written so much that you will be provided with excellent statistics on how something should be written. I’ve used this method for all languages that I know, including Esperanto and even Irish Gaelic, and Google has almost always provided me with the correct way of saying something. Note that this is obviously not a foolproof method, but only a basic good indicator. There’s no good number to look for, just comparisons, but usually hundreds of thousands or millions of results is a pretty good indicator! If possible read the summary of the first few pages to make sure that the words are indeed appearing in a natural sentence (instead of a new sentence starting half way through your phrase for example).

Firefox and Open Office spell-checker

Google has a spell-checker too of course, with its “Did you mean…” suggestion. But this can be tediuous if you want to be sure that every word you are writing is spelt correctly. That’s were the excellent dictionaries included in Firefox and Open Office come in! Anyone who has used MS Word may be familiar with the red squiggly lines that are put under words, with a right-click option to correct it. This is fine when you are writing in English, but (at least in the versions that I’ve used) it’s been quite hard or impossible to use it with particular foreign languages. Of course MS Office is quite expensive anyway!

And that’s where Open Office comes in. It’s a completely free equivalent to the Microsoft Suite that works just as well (and even better in some cases), and can be installed on Windows, Mac and Linux systems. It’s free not because it “isn’t as good”, but because it is Open Source and written by the community for the community. This has given it a lot of extra features, and a widely covered language range is one of them. You can add any language option you like, which includes a spell-checker, thesaurus and hyphenation check. This will automatically indicate when you have written something incorrectly as you type, and suggest a replacement. If you keep making the same mistakes you will soon get the idea!

BONUS TIP: I have occasionally used Open Office to keep a journal in the language I happen to be learning, to encourage me to write something and think of ways of expressing myself every day. I have started doing this in Czech to force me to “use” the language even on days when I am not being social, and its automatic corrections have taught me plenty!

Of course, you don’t even need to leave your browser! I’m glad to see that according to my site analytics, 52% of you use Mozilla Firefox! Google Chrome, Safari and Opera are also excellent browsers. If you use Microsoft Internet Explorer, please consider clicking one of these links for a much-improved browsing experience. I will be coming back to advantages that I have found in Firefox for language learning another time. For spell-checking purposes Firefox has been excellent! (Feel free to share other-browser spell-checking experiences in the comments). In my current version of the ‘fox, right clicking any text input field (in an email for example) with “check spelling” enabled, includes a “Languages” option and “Add dictionaries”. Add your dictionary of choice (or several!!) and select it when you are writing in that language. This also works live for in-browser chatting, such as in Gmail and for facebook chat. It’s is ideal for someone who likes switching between two or more languages in their Internet communication.

Yahoo Answers: Ask a native and get a response immediately!

Yahoo! Answers is an interesting site: you can ask a question about a wide range of topics and get an answer within a very short time from someone interested in that topic. There are plenty of other sites equivalent to it, but the problem is that most of those using the (non-paid) sites, including Y! Answers, are amateurs just there to pass the time, so the answers they give sometimes may not be that useful.

However, Yahoo! Answers has equivalents in many major languages! Looking at the links at the bottom of Y! Answers shows the International equivalents, which includes Y! Answers in Spanish, French, Italian, Portuguese, German, Japanese, and a few others. (No Czech version unfortunately :P ) If you are still in the very early stages of learning a language and would be more comfortable asking in English, it’s best to use the English version of the site and ask in the Society and Culture, Languages section. But be careful because a lot of lazy people will just use automatic translation sites if you want something translated. It’s best to write down your attempt and ask people to correct it and someone who is fluent in the language will come along (usually very quickly!)

Ideally, you would ask in the language itself, on the equivalent site in that language (again, in the Society and Culture, Languages section). These will be read and answered by natives. Even though most people using this site are teenagers there to kill time, most questions that we may have are very easy for natives, so they are happy to help. If possible wait until you get a few answers (many answers may be provided even within 5 minutes of posting) to be sure. A free Yahoo account is required for this. Since the methods I mentioned above work fine for basic grammar and spelling, you only need the forums when you have a more complicated question that a native really has to answer, or if you want a short (non-confidential) text proofread by a native.

So many other ways!

There are plenty of other online forums, and the best ones to ask questions on are those specifically for language learners or language lovers. I focussed on Yahoo! Answers simply because the responses are always given extremely quickly, but there are loads of more. The forums at wordreference.com are excellent for the best explanations from other language learners and natives and it has a very wide range of languages (including Czech). For Irish Gaelic you can use the forums on irishgaelictranslator.com and for Esperanto, the forums on lernu.net and for other major languages there are a lot of forums out there! Almost all are free and have plenty of helpful and intelligent people on them!

If you know of good websites for this purpose, please share links with us in the comments! I’ll be discussing good online dictionaries another day, but what other ways does your computer and the Internet help you learn languages? Do share all of your favourite (free) programs and links with us in comments!

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Comments: If you liked this post or have anything to say, please leave a comment! I love reading them :)
Just keep in mind that I’ll delete any rude, trolling, spammy, irrelevant or way off-topic comments. Also, use your REAL name, not a brand or business one, and don’t link to your site in the comments unless it’s relevant to this post.
If you have a general language learning question, please ask it in the forums. Otherwise please use the search tool on the right for any other question not related to this post.

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  • Bill in the Bronx

    If, to use your example, you want to know what preposition to use between ‘commencer’ and ‘faire’, you can save yourself some time by using an asterisk as a “wild card”, e.g., “commencer * faire” (with the quotation marks, of course) in your search. Aside from sparing you the time it would take to enter and search for every possible alternative you might think of, this will often reveal possibilities that you hadn’t thought of. In this example, Google returns not only “commencer à faire” but also “commencer par faire”, which might be a useful addition to your verbal repertoire if you didn’t already know it.

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com/ benny

      Interesting contribution Bill :) It does indeed show other options!! The only problem is that you won’t see the actual number represented by each of the options, since it collects them together, and you will have to hope that those on the front page are relevant to what you want to say. The asterisk method is fantastic for certain searches, but the searches themselves don’t interest me so much in this situation as the NUMBER of results ;)
      Don’t worry, I knew about commencer par :P Doesn’t take a huge stretch of the imagination to understand it means “start by”. I was talking specifically about start doing ;) In French it is a little tricky sometimes for learners to remember whether to say à/de/no preposition between two verbs, so I took that as an example. ;)

  • Bill in the Bronx

    If, to use your example, you want to know what preposition to use between ‘commencer’ and ‘faire’, you can save yourself some time by using an asterisk as a “wild card”, e.g., “commencer * faire” (with the quotation marks, of course) in your search. Aside from sparing you the time it would take to enter and search for every possible alternative you might think of, this will often reveal possibilities that you hadn’t thought of. In this example, Google returns not only “commencer à faire” but also “commencer par faire”, which might be a useful addition to your verbal repertoire if you didn’t already know it.

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com benny

      Interesting contribution Bill :) It does indeed show other options!! The only problem is that you won’t see the actual number represented by each of the options, since it collects them together, and you will have to hope that those on the front page are relevant to what you want to say. The asterisk method is fantastic for certain searches, but the searches themselves don’t interest me so much in this situation as the NUMBER of results ;)
      Don’t worry, I knew about commencer par :P Doesn’t take a huge stretch of the imagination to understand it means “start by”. I was talking specifically about start doing ;) In French it is a little tricky sometimes for learners to remember whether to say à/de/no preposition between two verbs, so I took that as an example. ;)

  • http://joop.kiefte.eu/ Joop Kiefte

    Nice to see you post actually nothing new to me in your blog. It seems we have had similar experiences already, although I am quite younger. About Yahoo Answers for language learning, good idea. For most other questions I prefer Aardvark by now, but unfortunately it is English-only for now.

    I bought you an orange juice already, I want to encourage others to do the same, because Benny is a great guy who can use it well :).

    Bonege ke vi ĉeestis en IJK kaj ke vi ŝatis. Mi ĉiam iom timas pri la ĝenerala impreso de Esperantistoj al la ekstera publiko, sed mi kredas ke la viruso jam tiom kaptis vin ke al vi ne ĝenas :) kaj kiel ajn vi simple faras kion vi ŝatas, kaj ne kion oni opinias normala. Saĝa vi estas!

    Ĝis poste! All the best!

    Joop

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com/ benny

      Thanks again for the delicious Orange Juice Joop ;)
      Yes, of course all my posts can’t be brand new information to everyone. You’re younger than me but you’ve been learning languages for several years so of course we would have gone down the same path at many stages. :) I still have a few tricks up my sleeve, but I’d like to show basically everything useful that I may know to people here ;)
      Make sure you add any info that you feel would help in future comments!
      Ĝis JES ;)

  • LaPingvino

    Nice to see you post actually nothing new to me in your blog. It seems we have had similar experiences already, although I am quite younger. About Yahoo Answers for language learning, good idea. For most other questions I prefer Aardvark by now, but unfortunately it is English-only for now.

    I bought you an orange juice already, I want to encourage others to do the same, because Benny is a great guy who can use it well :).

    Bonege ke vi ĉeestis en IJK kaj ke vi ŝatis. Mi ĉiam iom timas pri la ĝenerala impreso de Esperantistoj al la ekstera publiko, sed mi kredas ke la viruso jam tiom kaptis vin ke al vi ne ĝenas :) kaj kiel ajn vi simple faras kion vi ŝatas, kaj ne kion oni opinias normala. Saĝa vi estas!

    Ĝis poste! All the best!

    Joop

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com benny

      Thanks again for the delicious Orange Juice Joop ;)
      Yes, of course all my posts can’t be brand new information to everyone. You’re younger than me but you’ve been learning languages for several years so of course we would have gone down the same path at many stages. :) I still have a few tricks up my sleeve, but I’d like to show basically everything useful that I may know to people here ;)
      Make sure you add any info that you feel would help in future comments!
      Ĝis JES ;)

  • Foustka

    Well, at least when it comes to Czech it’s always better to use site:.cz when searching for a particular search term in the language – the very first result for a search for “v městě” is Slovak btw. The usage in Czech is a bit archaic – better would be “ve městě”, the bad news is that google won’t correct that for you. Another advice would be trying some local search engine, for Czech language I’d suggest jyxo.cz. It won’t correct “v” to “ve” for you either but provided you already know the right preposition, you can just type ve město in the search box and it will try to find the right inflected form. The added benefit that comes along with this method is that you don’t have to constrain the search to Czech domains only.

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com/ benny

      Whoops!! Very silly mistake I made there!! I was focussing on the second word, I forgot about the first :( Thanks for pointing it out, I’ve corrected it ;) I’ve spoken it way more than written it; I knew that rule but hadn’t needed to apply it, so forget it obviously!
      If I had written that in Open Office, the punctuation checker would have corrected me (in the same way it does for English a/an issues), but of course you’ve found a pretty big hole in the Google search theory!! As I said, it’s not perfect; a decent amount of basic knowledge of the language needs to be known and my Czech is a bit Swiss Cheese right now :P

  • Foustka

    Well, at least when it comes to Czech it’s always better to use site:.cz when searching for a particular search term in the language – the very first result for a search for “v městě” is Slovak btw. The usage in Czech is a bit archaic – better would be “ve městě”, the bad news is that google won’t correct that for you. Another advice would be trying some local search engine, for Czech language I’d suggest jyxo.cz. It won’t correct “v” to “ve” for you either but provided you already know the right preposition, you can just type ve město in the search box and it will try to find the right inflected form. The added benefit that comes along with this method is that you don’t have to constrain the search to Czech domains only.

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com benny

      Whoops!! Very silly mistake I made there!! I was focussing on the second word, I forgot about the first :( Thanks for pointing it out, I’ve corrected it ;) I’ve spoken it way more than written it; I knew that rule but hadn’t needed to apply it, so forget it obviously!
      If I had written that in Open Office, the punctuation checker would have corrected me (in the same way it does for English a/an issues), but of course you’ve found a pretty big hole in the Google search theory!! As I said, it’s not perfect; a decent amount of basic knowledge of the language needs to be known and my Czech is a bit Swiss Cheese right now :P

  • http://joop.kiefte.eu/ Joop Kiefte

    Benny, me again. Sorry for interrupting the silence. Where did you take that picture?

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com/ benny

      Silence? :) The post has only been up for a couple of hours :P
      That’s at Google.org headquarters in downtown San Francisco (not to be confused with Google.com’s headquarters in Mountain View.) A friend of the family gave me a personal tour

  • LaPingvino

    Benny, me again. Sorry for interrupting the silence. Where did you take that picture?

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com benny

      Silence? :) The post has only been up for a couple of hours :P
      That’s at Google.org headquarters in downtown San Francisco (not to be confused with Google.com’s headquarters in Mountain View.) A friend of the family gave me a personal tour

  • http://molista.blogspot.com/ Γλαύκος

    For the greek lerners i would like to propose a very intersting Cypriot site with a detailed forum inside …the link is

    http://www.kypros.org/LearnGreek/

    Always happy to help greek lerners …One day i should speak about my experience of learning russian …

    best regards , Glavkos

  • http://molista.blogspot.com/ Γλαύκος

    For the greek lerners i would like to propose a very intersting Cypriot site with a detailed forum inside …the link is

    http://www.kypros.org/LearnGreek/

    Always happy to help greek lerners …One day i should speak about my experience of learning russian …

    best regards , Glavkos

  • http://www.anthonylauder.com/ SplogSplog

    For finding the right word endings in Czech I recommend this site: http://prirucka.ujc.cas.cz/

    I guess you already know this online dictionary: http://slovnik.cz/

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com/ benny

      Thanks!! I’ll be using that first link a lot in the coming weeks :)

  • http://www.anthonylauder.com/ SplogSplog

    For finding the right word endings in Czech I recommend this site: http://prirucka.ujc.cas.cz/

    I guess you already know this online dictionary: http://slovnik.cz/

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com benny

      Thanks!! I’ll be using that first link a lot in the coming weeks :)

  • http://otevotnyelv.blog.hu/ balint

    My only concern about this google stuff comes from learning English. Since this is the language of the internet (at least, in the Western culture), everybody uses it, even those who don’t speak it well. And when I don’t know something (how they say) and I google it, I might get false information without knowing it (provided I’m not an advanced learner therefore I have to believe what others say) – no feedback that would help.
    And those sorry-ass little phrases I hate so much in English :D Take out, take on, take over, take up, take down, take for, take in, etc. :D Easy to get lost for a beginner and almost impossible to master for a non-native. (or I might be too lame :D)
    Anyway, one needs a very good preposition dictionary (this might come in handy: http://www.englishpage.com/prepositions/phrasaldictionary.html).
    And if you simply use google numbers to guess which is the right form of a word, you might use the wrong one – if I type “take” into the searchbox it prompts me with “take 40 – 216.000.000″, “taken – 592.000.000″, “take out – 92.000.000) etc. But this is not what I’m looking for. Things like that. But anyway, I have to agree, Internet is an amazing thing to help you learn a language! :D
    .-= balint´s last blog ..Összefoglaló – 30. és 31. hét =-.

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com/ benny

      A very good point balint! When something you write isn’t actually wrong but used in a completely different context, then I would recommend against using this method. In English for example, it would be useful if you wanted to remember if a certain noun was countable or not. If you entered “information is useful” versus “informations are useful” (a very common mistake learners make, because information is countable in many languages), then it will indeed be a huge help. It’s better to use it when you know only one of your options can be right.
      For phrasal verbs, it may be useful using a word that fits the right context. If you forget which preposition to use with “back” to indicate moving backwards then try what you think may work for the word you want to use, like “the car backed away” versus “the car backed up“. “Back away” is a true phrasal verb, but we wouldn’t use it for cars (more for people/animals etc.) and Google gives a nice vague indication of this. If you replace “car” with “man” in these examples, you get the reverse number of results and know which one to use :)
      So if you can use it for something where you are quite sure that one of them will be wrong (which is not the case for searching for random phrasal verbs out of context), then it can come in handy :)

  • http://otevotnyelv.blog.hu balint

    My only concern about this google stuff comes from learning English. Since this is the language of the internet (at least, in the Western culture), everybody uses it, even those who don’t speak it well. And when I don’t know something (how they say) and I google it, I might get false information without knowing it (provided I’m not an advanced learner therefore I have to believe what others say) – no feedback that would help.
    And those sorry-ass little phrases I hate so much in English :D Take out, take on, take over, take up, take down, take for, take in, etc. :D Easy to get lost for a beginner and almost impossible to master for a non-native. (or I might be too lame :D)
    Anyway, one needs a very good preposition dictionary (this might come in handy: http://www.englishpage.com/prepositions/phrasaldictionary.html).
    And if you simply use google numbers to guess which is the right form of a word, you might use the wrong one – if I type “take” into the searchbox it prompts me with “take 40 – 216.000.000″, “taken – 592.000.000″, “take out – 92.000.000) etc. But this is not what I’m looking for. Things like that. But anyway, I have to agree, Internet is an amazing thing to help you learn a language! :D
    .-= balint´s last blog ..Összefoglaló – 30. és 31. hét =-.

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com benny

      A very good point balint! When something you write isn’t actually wrong but used in a completely different context, then I would recommend against using this method. In English for example, it would be useful if you wanted to remember if a certain noun was countable or not. If you entered “information is useful” versus “informations are useful” (a very common mistake learners make, because information is countable in many languages), then it will indeed be a huge help. It’s better to use it when you know only one of your options can be right.
      For phrasal verbs, it may be useful using a word that fits the right context. If you forget which preposition to use with “back” to indicate moving backwards then try what you think may work for the word you want to use, like “the car backed away” versus “the car backed up“. “Back away” is a true phrasal verb, but we wouldn’t use it for cars (more for people/animals etc.) and Google gives a nice vague indication of this. If you replace “car” with “man” in these examples, you get the reverse number of results and know which one to use :)
      So if you can use it for something where you are quite sure that one of them will be wrong (which is not the case for searching for random phrasal verbs out of context), then it can come in handy :)

  • http://vikid.wordpress.com/ Vid

    A variation on the theme above, which I have found to be tremendously useful, is to download, scan and document everything you read in your target language into searchable PDF’s.

    Then providing you have a half decent computer ( a Mac serves beautifully here) you can get most of the answer you need simply from the search function on the desktop or from a dedicated piece of software like DEVONthink.

    It’s a little bit more time consuming, but then, you don’t even need an internet connection. Ideal when you are on the move ;-)
    .-= Vid´s last blog ..Population Growth =-.

  • http://vikid.wordpress.com Vid

    A variation on the theme above, which I have found to be tremendously useful, is to download, scan and document everything you read in your target language into searchable PDF’s.

    Then providing you have a half decent computer ( a Mac serves beautifully here) you can get most of the answer you need simply from the search function on the desktop or from a dedicated piece of software like DEVONthink.

    It’s a little bit more time consuming, but then, you don’t even need an internet connection. Ideal when you are on the move ;-)
    .-= Vid´s last blog ..Population Growth =-.

  • Benjameno

    Benny, komplimentojn je via blogo estetike plaĉa kaj konsiloriĉa. Ĝi estas inter miaj plej ŝatataj kiuj pritraktas lingvolernadon, precipe ĉar vi ne pedante altrudas viajn proprajn teoriojn kaj libere spicas viajn artikolojn per humuro.

    Kaze de via nescio, ekzistas retpaĝo kies populareco konstante kreskas, kaj kiu certe estus meritinta mencion supre. Ĝi nomiĝas http://www.lang-8.com; esence temas pri komunumo da poliglotoj, ĉiu posedanta sian propran surretan taglibron. Oni verkas tekstojn je ajna longeco en la lernata(j) lingvo(j), kiuj poste korektiĝos de uzantoj kiuj parolas tiun lingvon denaske. Ĉio senpagas.

    Pluverkadu!

    Benjameno

  • Benjameno

    Benny, komplimentojn je via blogo estetike plaĉa kaj konsiloriĉa. Ĝi estas inter miaj plej ŝatataj kiuj pritraktas lingvolernadon, precipe ĉar vi ne pedante altrudas viajn proprajn teoriojn kaj libere spicas viajn artikolojn per humuro.

    Kaze de via nescio, ekzistas retpaĝo kies populareco konstante kreskas, kaj kiu certe estus meritinta mencion supre. Ĝi nomiĝas http://www.lang-8.com; esence temas pri komunumo da poliglotoj, ĉiu posedanta sian propran surretan taglibron. Oni verkas tekstojn je ajna longeco en la lernata(j) lingvo(j), kiuj poste korektiĝos de uzantoj kiuj parolas tiun lingvon denaske. Ĉio senpagas.

    Pluverkadu!

    Benjameno

  • Charles

    Benny,

    Nice post. I have a slightly different trick for spelling–instead of using Word or OpenOffice, I type whatever I need to write into gmail. It has a spell check feature that works in many different languages. So, I write, then spell check, accept the corrections, then copy into whichever document I need it to go into.

    Keep up the good work. I greatly enjoy your posts.

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com/ benny

      Hi Charles! Welcome to comment-land :D
      An interesting suggestion, but for learning purposes I would recommend against it! That spell checker only checks the whole text of your email each time you request it to by clicking the “check spelling” option, i.e. not as you write. Although it will indeed correct you, the temptation is just to accept the corrections after you’ve written the email and move on. You may not learn very efficiently this way. It’s better that your computer tells you immediately (with the red underline) that you have made a mistake so that you are constantly reminded not to make the same mistake again. Firefox’s spell-checker also works in Gmail’s email input field :) Give it a try!
      Thanks for the compliments! Hope to hear more comments from you in future.

  • Charles

    Benny,

    Nice post. I have a slightly different trick for spelling–instead of using Word or OpenOffice, I type whatever I need to write into gmail. It has a spell check feature that works in many different languages. So, I write, then spell check, accept the corrections, then copy into whichever document I need it to go into.

    Keep up the good work. I greatly enjoy your posts.

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com benny

      Hi Charles! Welcome to comment-land :D
      An interesting suggestion, but for learning purposes I would recommend against it! That spell checker only checks the whole text of your email each time you request it to by clicking the “check spelling” option, i.e. not as you write. Although it will indeed correct you, the temptation is just to accept the corrections after you’ve written the email and move on. You may not learn very efficiently this way. It’s better that your computer tells you immediately (with the red underline) that you have made a mistake so that you are constantly reminded not to make the same mistake again. Firefox’s spell-checker also works in Gmail’s email input field :) Give it a try!
      Thanks for the compliments! Hope to hear more comments from you in future.

  • Cainntear

    Do it in style: http://www.googlefight.com …!

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com/ benny

      Excellent link!! :D I love it!

  • Cainntear

    Do it in style: http://www.googlefight.com …!

    • http://www.fluentin3months.com benny

      Excellent link!! :D I love it!

  • http://otevotnyelv.blog.hu/ balint

    Hi all,

    Sorry Benny ruining your business :D, but I just found this intersting article about the topic and I thought I would share it.

    http://www.antimoon.com/forum/2002/176.htm
    .-= balint´s last blog ..Összefoglaló – 32. hét =-.

  • http://otevotnyelv.blog.hu balint

    Hi all,

    Sorry Benny ruining your business :D, but I just found this intersting article about the topic and I thought I would share it.

    http://www.antimoon.com/forum/2002/176.htm
    .-= balint´s last blog ..Összefoglaló – 32. hét =-.

  • http://www.englishcafe.com/blog/how-make-google-yo Jim Stroud

    Great post! I wrote something along those lines on my EnglishCafe blog. Click Here to check it out. Its called “How to make Google your English Teacher.” (Part 4)

    Let me know what you think?

    Jim Stroud
    Social Media Development Manager
    http://www.EnglishCafe.com

  • http://www.englishcafe.com/blog/how-make-google-yo Jim Stroud

    Great post! I wrote something along those lines on my EnglishCafe blog. Click Here to check it out. Its called “How to make Google your English Teacher.” (Part 4)

    Let me know what you think?

    Jim Stroud
    Social Media Development Manager
    http://www.EnglishCafe.com

  • http://www.fluentin3months.com/ benny

    @Balint & @Jim
    Thanks for those two links. Always good to see another perspective on something I discussed :)

  • http://www.fluentin3months.com benny

    @Balint & @Jim
    Thanks for those two links. Always good to see another perspective on something I discussed :)

  • http://twitter.com/tumbledesign Tumble Design

    After reading this article, I can't help but comment about a project I've been working on called transissimo (http://transissimo.com). In its current phase, it is very much like answers.yahoo but specifically for translations.

    We're in a private beta right now and have some cool plans for the future. I don't want to spam up your comments, but if you're interested in hearing more, don't hesitate to get in touch :)

    Loving your blog!
    -Nicky

  • http://www.MyBeautifulAdventures.com/ GlobalButterfly

    Downloading Open Office as I write this. My fave translating site for Spanish is spanishdict.com. It's such an awesome resource!

  • Antonio

    I want to know only how the computer can correct my writing in Spanis like it does in English

  • Jeff Winchell

    Microsoft Office’s grammar checker (at least in German) is excellent. Actually too good as it makes me too lazy to learn the right declination or gender when actually speaking (or when I need to write without a computer).

  • Doreen

    My Name is Doreen, i am so happy because a great spell caster helped me with a spell that brought my ex back. Do you need a spell to bring your ex back then contact Doctor Zaza now via email: indiaspellcaster@hotmail.com

  • Sae Kyung

    Nice post. I have a slightly different trick for spelling–instead of using Word or OpenOffice. Grammar checking is always difficult. NOUNPLUS Online Free Grammar Checker of English helps those who engage in academic, professional or creative writing to check grammar, making English grammar rules easier.